November 26, 1974: Bake McBride wins the NL Rookie of the Year Award

Bake McBride may have been the most unlikely Rookie of the Year in baseball history. Growing up, McBride believed he was more likely to make his living playing basketball or football than playing baseball. In high school, he didn’t even play baseball, as his school didn’t have a team. Instead, he played football and basketball.[1]…

November 24, 1986: Todd Worrell is named NL Rookie of the Year

On July 18, 1985, the course of Todd Worrell’s career changed forever. Cardinals director of player development Lee Thomas was in the stands watching Worrell pitch for Triple-A Louisville against the Iowa Cubs. The 6-foot-5 right-hander was “something of a mystery to baseball men,” as the Cardinals’ 1985 media guide put it. In his second…

November 22, 2013: Cardinals trade Freese and Salas for Bourjos and Grichuk

Less than 25 months after David Freese’s game-winning home run landed in the grass beyond the center-field wall at Busch Stadium to end Game 6 of the 2011 World Series, the Cardinals traded their hometown hero and the architect of the greatest postseason moment in franchise history. On November 22, 2013, the Cardinals traded Freese…

November 17, 2014: Cardinals trade for Jason Heyward following Oscar Taveras’s passing

Just 22 days after outfielder Oscar Taveras passed away in an alcohol-related car accident in his native Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, the Cardinals traded away two young pitchers to obtain the player they hoped would take Taveras’s place as their right fielder of the future. On November 17, 2014, the Cardinals traded pitchers Shelby Miller…

November 14, 2011: Cardinals name Mike Matheny manager

Just 15 days after Tony La Russa announced his retirement, the St. Louis Cardinals named Mike Matheny the 49th manager in franchise history. The hire represented a stark shift for the Cardinals less than a month after they won their 11th World Series championship. La Russa had retired with 2,728 career wins, just 35 behind…

November 13, 1968: Bob Gibson named National League MVP

In Bob Gibson’s autobiography, Stranger to the Game, he summarized his historic 1968 season simply: “In the summer of 1968, I mastered my craft,” he wrote.[1] That mastery was rewarded with both the National League Cy Young and Most Valuable Player awards. On November 13, 1968, Gibson became the 14th Cardinal in franchise history to…

November 7, 1967: Voters unanimously name Orlando Cepeda NL MVP

In 1967, Orlando Cepeda was more than the heart of the World Series champion “El Birdos.” On November 7, he was named the first unanimous National League MVP since Carl Hubbell received all six first-place votes in 1936. “The Most Valuable Player Award, that’s the best compliment any ballplayer can desire,” Cepeda said.[1] The recognition…