’70s

February 25, 1972: Cardinals trade Steve Carlton to the Phillies

Philadelphia Phillies general manager Quinn answered the phone on Wednesday, February 25, 1972, to discover his Cardinals counterpart, Bing Devine, on the other end. “Has Rick Wise signed?” Devine asked, referring to the 26-year-old right-hander who had led the Phillies in wins each of the past three seasons. Quinn answered that no, he had not …

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February 1, 1970: The Veterans Committee elects Jesse Haines to the Hall of Fame

More than 43 years after he helped the St. Louis Cardinals win their first World Series championship, Jesse “Pop” Haines was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee at age 76. It wasn’t a bad achievement for a pitcher whose former minor-league manager with the Tulsa Oilers expected him back …

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January 25, 1979: Cardinals acquire John Stuper in trade with the Pirates

A little less than four years before John Stuper won Game 6 of the 1982 World Series, the Cardinals obtained him in a minor-league trade that wasn’t even mentioned in either the St. Louis Post-Dispatch or the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. In the deal, the Cardinals sent infielder Tommy Sandt to the Pirates in exchange for Stuper, …

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November 26, 1974: Bake McBride wins the NL Rookie of the Year Award

Bake McBride may have been the most unlikely Rookie of the Year in baseball history. Growing up, McBride believed he was more likely to make his living playing basketball or football than playing baseball. In high school, he didn’t even play baseball, as his school didn’t have a team. Instead, he played football and basketball.[1] …

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September 10, 1974: Lou Brock breaks Maury Wills’ single-season stolen base record

It’s hard enough to break a modern-day Major League Baseball record when you’re healthy. In 1974, injuries to both his hands may actually have helped Lou Brock break Maury Wills’ single-season stolen base record. Due to a right thumb injury, Brock had wrapped the digit in tape most of the season. On his left hand, …

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August 13, 1979: Lou Brock collects his 3,000th career hit in resurgent final season

Technically, Lou Brock’s pursuit of 3,000 career hits began September 10, 1962, when he singled in his major league debut with the Chicago Cubs. However, the Cardinals legend didn’t give serious thought to the milestone until speaking to Detroit Tigers outfielder Al Kaline in 1974. That season, the 40-year-old Kaline had reached the milestone in …

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July 17, 1974: Bob Gibson throws 3,000th strikeout the same day Dizzy Dean passes away

The same day the Cardinals lost one of the best pitchers in franchise history, another claimed his 3,000th strikeout victim. On July 17, 1974, Bob Gibson claimed the 3,000th strikeout of his career, retiring Cesar Geronimo on strikes in a 6-4 loss to the Reds. Early that morning, Dizzy Dean, the unquestioned ace of the …

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July 12, 1974: Bob Forsch throws a complete-game shutout for his first career win

Bob Forsch wasn’t leaving his first major league win to chance. After losing his debut appearance with just two runs allowed over 6 2/3 innings, Forsch returned five days later, on July 12, 1974, and threw nine shutout innings to lead the Cardinals to a 10-0 victory in the second game of a double-header against …

July 12, 1974: Bob Forsch throws a complete-game shutout for his first career win Read More »