Dizzy Dean

October 9, 1934: Dizzy Dean shuts out Detroit and Joe Medwick nearly sparks a riot as the Cardinals win World Series Game 7

At the end of a roller-coaster season, it was fitting that the 1934 St. Louis Cardinals’ final game was a madcap affair, complete with a fight between players, a near-riot in the stands, and Dizzy Dean testing out new pitches en route to an 11-0 victory over the Detroit Tigers in Game 7 of the …

October 9, 1934: Dizzy Dean shuts out Detroit and Joe Medwick nearly sparks a riot as the Cardinals win World Series Game 7 Read More »

September 30, 1934: Dizzy Dean’s 30th win clinches the National League pennant

After pitching their second complete game in three days, most men would have applied every cube of ice they could find to their aching pitching arm. After shutting out the Reds on the final day of the 1934 season to secure the National League championship, Dizzy Dean had other ideas. Shortly after Dean walked off …

September 30, 1934: Dizzy Dean’s 30th win clinches the National League pennant Read More »

July 27, 1953: Dizzy Dean is inducted into the Hall of Fame

On July 27, 1953, the Baseball Hall of Fame celebrated Dizzy Dean’s remarkable career with an induction ceremony that formally recognized Dean as one of the game’s elite. “It’s the greatest honor I ever received,” Dean said. “I want to thank the good Lord for giving me a good right arm, a strong back, and …

July 27, 1953: Dizzy Dean is inducted into the Hall of Fame Read More »

July 17, 1974: Bob Gibson throws 3,000th strikeout the same day Dizzy Dean passes away

The same day the Cardinals lost one of the best pitchers in franchise history, another claimed his 3,000th strikeout victim. On July 17, 1974, Bob Gibson claimed the 3,000th strikeout of his career, retiring Cesar Geronimo on strikes in a 6-4 loss to the Reds. Early that morning, Dizzy Dean, the unquestioned ace of the …

July 17, 1974: Bob Gibson throws 3,000th strikeout the same day Dizzy Dean passes away Read More »

July 16, 1935: Dizzy Dean wins over the crowd as he accepts the NL MVP trophy

On July 16, 1935, as he accepted the Sporting News 1934 National League Most Valuable Player trophy, Dizzy Dean took the opportunity to win over the fans once again following a brief controversy regarding an exhibition game in Illinois. It was, perhaps, surprising that Dean had to win over the fans at all after his …

July 16, 1935: Dizzy Dean wins over the crowd as he accepts the NL MVP trophy Read More »

July 1, 1934: Dizzy Dean pitches 17 frames and Joe Medwick hits a game-winning homer in 18-inning marathon

Dizzy Dean may not have been at his best when he faced the Reds July 1, 1934, at Crosley Field, but his 17-inning pitching performance kept the Cardinals in the game long enough to top Cincinnati, 8-6. Dean entered the game having won 11 of his last 12 decisions and each of his last four …

July 1, 1934: Dizzy Dean pitches 17 frames and Joe Medwick hits a game-winning homer in 18-inning marathon Read More »

May 11, 1934: Paul Dean emerges with extra-inning win over Carl Hubbell and the defending world champion Giants

Two months after signing his first major-league contract with the St. Louis Cardinals, Paul Dean’s burgeoning career was at a crossroads. His big brother, Dizzy Dean, had taken it upon himself to serve as Paul’s spokesperson, telling anyone who would listen that his little brother was an even better pitcher than he was, and predicting …

May 11, 1934: Paul Dean emerges with extra-inning win over Carl Hubbell and the defending world champion Giants Read More »

September 28, 1930: Dizzy Dean makes his major-league debut

With the National League championship wrapped up and a berth to the World Series guaranteed, the St. Louis Cardinals used their regular-season finale to get their first glimpse of 20-year-old Jay Hanna Dean – more commonly known as Dizzy Dean. One year prior, Dean had been pitching while stationed with the U.S. Army at Fort …

September 28, 1930: Dizzy Dean makes his major-league debut Read More »

September 21, 1934: Hours after his brother throws a three-hit shutout, Paul Dean throws the second no-hitter in Cardinals history

After watching Dizzy Dean spin a three-hit shutout and Paul Dean throw the second no-hitter in St. Louis Cardinals history, Brooklyn Times-Union sportswriter Bill McCullough was moved to poetry with his lede in the next day’s paper: You may sing the praises of Mickey Cochrane’s Tigers and the glory of the Giants from the housetops. …

September 21, 1934: Hours after his brother throws a three-hit shutout, Paul Dean throws the second no-hitter in Cardinals history Read More »