Joe Torre

August 1, 1990: Cardinals name Joe Torre manager as Whiteyball era ends

On August 1, 1990, the St. Louis Cardinals officially moved on from the “Whiteyball” era when they brought former Cardinals star Joe Torre back to take the managerial position vacated by Whitey Herzog just three weeks earlier. “During the selection process, I interviewed a number of very good candidates,” Cardinals general manager Dal Maxvill said, …

August 1, 1990: Cardinals name Joe Torre manager as Whiteyball era ends Read More »

December 12, 1994: Tom Henke signs deal to play his final season in St. Louis

Just a couple weeks shy of his 37th birthday, baseball had taken Tom Henke from Texas to Toronto and back again. Now the 6-foot-5 right-hander was ready to return to his roots. On December 12, 1994, Henke signed a one-year, $2-million contract to serve as the Cardinals’ closer in 1995. The 13-year major-league veteran had …

December 12, 1994: Tom Henke signs deal to play his final season in St. Louis Read More »

July 17, 1974: Bob Gibson throws 3,000th strikeout the same day Dizzy Dean passes away

The same day the Cardinals lost one of the best pitchers in franchise history, another claimed his 3,000th strikeout victim. On July 17, 1974, Bob Gibson claimed the 3,000th strikeout of his career, retiring Cesar Geronimo on strikes in a 6-4 loss to the Reds. Early that morning, Dizzy Dean, the unquestioned ace of the …

July 17, 1974: Bob Gibson throws 3,000th strikeout the same day Dizzy Dean passes away Read More »

June 27, 1973: Joe Torre hits for the cycle with an assist from Red Schoendienst

On June 27, 1973, Joe Torre hit for the cycle for the first time in his 13-year major league career. He had Cardinals manager Red Schoendienst to thank for it. After hitting an eighth-inning triple to move within a single of the cycle, Torre asked Schoendienst to remove him from the game. Sensing that Torre …

June 27, 1973: Joe Torre hits for the cycle with an assist from Red Schoendienst Read More »

August 14, 1971: Bob Gibson pitches his ‘greatest game,’ no-hits the Pirates

Bob Gibson predicted many times throughout his career that he would never throw a no-hitter.[1] Before taking the mound against the Pittsburgh Pirates on August 14, 1971, he still had never thrown one. Not in college. Not in the minors. Not even in the 1968, a season dubbed the “year of the pitcher,” in no …

August 14, 1971: Bob Gibson pitches his ‘greatest game,’ no-hits the Pirates Read More »